Journal Club

This blog originated as a press release from UCSD News.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego discovered that high blood levels of RNA produced by the PHGDH gene could serve as a biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease. The work could lead to the development of a blood test to identify individuals who will develop the disease years before they show symptoms.

The team published their findings in Current Biology.

The PHGDH gene produces RNA and proteins that are critical for brain development and function in infants, children, and adolescents. As people get older, the gene typically ramps down its production of these RNAs and proteins. The new study, led by Sheng Zhong, a professor of bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering in collaboration with Dr. Edward Koo, a professor of neuroscience at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that overproduction of extracellular RNA (exRNA) by the PHGDH gene in the elderly could provide an early warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

“Several known changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease usually show up around the time of clinical diagnosis, which is a little too late. We had a hunch that there is a molecular predictor that would show up years before, and that’s what motivated this study,” Zhong said.

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Extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate many processes in the healthy body. They also play a role in cancer, sending signals between cells in the tumor microenvironment. EVs can stimulate tumor cell migration, invasion, blood vessel growth, immune response, and cell survival, as well as metastasis. However, we know little about the cargo of these EVs that play such diverse roles. Analysis of vesicle cargo can shed light on the molecular mechanisms of vesicle biology and be helpful in disease diagnosis and prognosis.

I am lucky to be a member in Jan Lötvall’s lab in Gothenburg, Sweden, which pioneered the field of extracellular vesicles with the early discovery of exosomes shuttling RNA between cells. An exciting collaboration with Yong Song Gho from POSTECH in South Korea led us to develop a new approach to isolate vesicles from human tumor tissues. Using this technology, we were able to isolate and characterize subpopulations of extracellular vesicles from melanoma metastatic tissue. We just published our findings in the Journal of Extracellular Vesicles. Jan Lötvall also discussed them in a recent ERCC webinar.

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Flow cytometry (FC) is a powerful method for counting single cells and measuring their molecular components. There is increasing interest in applying flow cytometry to the analysis of extracellular vesicles (EV), but EVs are orders of magnitude smaller than the cells for which FC instruments and protocols were originally designed. To catalyze the development of new instruments and assays for EV flow cytometry, three scientific societies came together to form the EV Flow Cytometry Working Group (evflowcytometry.org):

  • ISEV, the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles
  • ISAC, the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry, and
  • ISTH, the International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

The working group first performed two standardization studies, distributing standards and samples to EV-FC laboratories worldwide to enable an objective comparison of methods, instruments, controls, and analytical tools. Those initial studies led to the realization that a standard framework for reporting experimental results is essential.

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Illinois researchers developed a method to detect microRNA cancer markers with single-molecule resolution, a technique that could be used for liquid biopsies.

From left: Taylor Canady, postdoctoral scholar; Andrew Smith, professor of bioengineering; Nantao Li, graduate student; Lucas Smith, postdoctoral scholar; and Brian Cunningham – professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; director of Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory.
Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Thanks to the University of Illinois News Bureau for allowing us to share this article here.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A fast, inexpensive yet sensitive technique to detect cancer markers is bringing researchers closer to a liquid biopsy – a test using a small sample of blood or serum to detect cancer, rather than the invasive tissue sampling routinely used for diagnosis.

Researchers at the University of Illinois developed a method to capture and count cancer-associated microRNAs, or tiny bits of messenger molecules that are exuded from cells and can be detected in blood or serum, with single-molecule resolution. The team published its results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

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Thanks to Eileen Leahy from Elsevier and Chhavi Chauhan, Director of Scientific Outreach for the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, for sharing this post here.

A novel non-invasive technique may detect human papilloma virus-16, the strain associated with oropharyngeal cancer, in saliva samples, reports The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

Philadelphia, December 13, 2019 – Unfortunately, cancers that occur in the back of the mouth and upper throat are often not diagnosed until they become advanced, partly because their location makes them difficult to see during routine clinical exams. A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes the use of acoustofluidics, a new non-invasive method that analyzes saliva for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV)-16, the pathogenic strain associated with oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). This novel technique detected OPC in whole saliva in 40 percent of patients tested and 80 percent of co published by Elsevier, describes the use of acoustofluidics, a new non-invasive method that analyzes saliva for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV)-16, the pathogenic strain associated with oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs). This novel technique detected OPC in whole saliva in 40 percent of patients tested and 80 percent of confirmed OPC patients.

“OPC has an approximate incidence of 115,000 cases per year worldwide and is one of the fastest-rising cancers in Western countries due to increasing HPV-related incidence, especially in younger patients. It is paramount that surveillance methods are developed to improve early detection and outcomes,” explained co-lead investigator Tony Jun Huang, PhD, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

“Considering these factors, the successful detection of HPV from salivary exosomes isolated by our acoustofluidic platform offers distinct advantages, including early detection, risk assessment, and screening,” added Dr. Huang. This technique may also help physicians predict which patients will respond well to radiation therapy or achieve longer progression-free survival.

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Malignant gliomas are highly aggressive brain tumors. Surgical removal and chemoradiation of the tumor are the standard of care. Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a compound called 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) as an imaging agent to aid in differentiating tumor from normal tissue during surgery. 5-ALA is a precursor in the heme biosynthesis pathway, which is inefficient in glioma cells because their strongly rewired metabolism does not rely on heme. When patients with malignant glioma ingest 5-ALA prior to surgery, the glioma cells fluoresce pink under a blue light due to their preferential uptake and conversion of 5-ALA to the final precursor in heme biosynthesis, the fluorescent molecule protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). We sought to investigate whether extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from PpIX-enriched glioma cells would fluoresce and be detectable in the blood of these patients.

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Rett Syndrome Research TrustCline laboratory at Scripps ResearchThis blog was first published on the Rett Syndrome Research Trust (RSRT) website. Thanks to Pranav Sharma and the Cline lab at Scripps Research for allowing us to share it here.

I am a scientist at Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California working in the lab of Professor Hollis Cline. A thirst for knowledge is what originally attracted me to science. The potential to contribute, even in a small way, to alleviating suffering drives that thirst and passion even more.

Human biology has always fascinated me. Imagine for a moment how the human body is created. It starts with a single cell that multiplies to create a complex organism of trillions of cells. The human brain alone is estimated to contain more than 150 billion cells, 86 billion neurons and about an equal number of non-neuronal cells, all of a wide variety of specializations. It is mind boggling to imagine that a few founder cells contain the programming information that, through a series of cell fate decisions, produces a complex organ like the brain. What kind of communication and logistics are required to orchestrate the development and function of this behemoth?

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This blog originated as a press release from the University of Sussex.

New research by scientists at the University of Sussex could be the first step towards developing a blood test to diagnose the most aggressive type of brain tumour, known as Glioblastoma.

A team from Professor Georgios Giamas’ lab at the University of Sussex has identified novel biomarkers within bodily fluids, which signal the presence of the tumour. Dr. Giamas is Professor of Cancer Cell Signalling in the School of Life Sciences.

Cancer biomarkers are molecules that are either exclusively found or over-expressed in cancer cells, as compared to ‘normal’, healthy cells. Biomarkers can be considered as biological signatures for a disease, as they indicate the presence of cancer in the body.

In a new paper published in the Nature journal Communications Biology, Professor Giamas and his team describe particular biomarkers that are associated with extracellular vesicles – small ’packages’ released by cells into bodily fluids so cells can communicate with each other.

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Tulane University

This blog post originated as a press release from Tulane University.

Asim Abdel-Mageed, DVM, PhD, professor of urology and Marguerite Main Zimmerman Professor of Cancer Research at the Tulane School of Medicine, was recently honored by the journal Scientific Reports for authoring one of the top 100 accessed oncology papers for the journal in 2018.

His publication, “High-throughput screening identified selective inhibitors of exosome biogenesis and secretion: a drug repurposing strategy for advanced cancer”, received 3,154 article views, placing it seventh on the list, which features authors from around the world whose papers highlight valuable research in oncology.

The article reveals the results of research supported by a $4.2 million National Institutes of Health grant awarded to Abdel-Mageed in 2014. His project involved using a rapid high-volume robotic screening technique to investigate drugs already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat a large variety of diseases or conditions to see which, if any, could also be effective in preventing prostate cancer metastasis.

Targeting Metastasis

For cancer cells to spread to other places in the body — or metastasize — they need to communicate with resident and recruited cells, such as stem cells. One way they do this is through biomolecular messages delivered in exosome cargos. Exosomes are molecules that carry information from cell to cell. “They are routinely biosynthesized and released by cancer cells, including prostate cancer, and are implicated in cancer progression,” said Abdel-Mageed.

Currently there are no known drugs that selectively target and inhibit the biosynthesis and release of exosomes by tumor cells. To accelerate the discovery of effective drugs, Abdel-Mageed and his team, in partnership with investigators at the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS), investigated 4,580 known pharmacologically active compounds and found that 22 — including antibiotics, antifungal medicines and anti-inflammatory agents — were effective in preventing advanced prostate tumor cells from releasing exosomes or in blocking their production.

Future Work

Since the Scientific Reports publication, subsequent research by Abdel-Mageed’s team has further narrowed their investigation to five of these agents, and he hopes in the near future to receive additional funding to support this work.

“Drug repurposing is a golden opportunity,” said Abdel-Mageed. “Because drug discovery from concept to market takes an average time of 12 years, our identified drugs, which are already human approved, could be repurposed for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer within a relatively short period of time. It represents a quick way of adding an adjuvant therapy to existing therapies that might curb the progression of cancer.”

As a steering committee member of the National Institutes of Health Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium (ERCC), a summary of Abdel-Mageed’s study was also published as part of the ERCC leading-edge perspective paper in Cell.

This blog post originated as a press release from Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

A report by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has shattered conventional wisdom about how cells, including cancer cells, shed DNA into the bloodstream: they don’t do it by packaging the genetic material in tiny vesicles called exosomes.

Their findings, reported April 4 in the journal Cell, have important implications for the development of “liquid biopsies” that could speed cancer diagnosis and improve treatment by detecting tumor-specific genetic material in the blood.

“It’s been a big deal that there is supposedly DNA in exosomes … (and) you could isolate these exosomes in a relatively simple way,” said the paper’s first author, Dennis Jeppesen, PhD. The problem is exosomes don’t contain DNA.

“Exosomes are not your target,” said Jeppesen, a research fellow in the lab of Robert Coffey, Jr., MD, who is internationally known for his studies of colorectal cancer. Instead, Jeppesen and his colleagues propose a new model for how DNA is actively secreted by cells.

Research by Robert Coffey, MD, left, Dennis Jeppesen, PhD, and colleagues has revealed a new way cells shed DNA into the bloodstream.
(Photo by Steve Green / Vanderbilt University)

Greater precision in determining how DNA, RNA, and proteins are packaged and secreted from cells “is crucial for identification of biomarkers and design of future drug interventions,” the researchers concluded.

Coffey, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, predicted the paper will “set the field on a firmer foundation” to understand what’s in exosomes and what’s not, and how exosomes might be used as biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

Coffey’s team is part a nationwide consortium funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the role of extracellular RNA in diseases including diabetes, glaucoma, muscular dystrophy, and cancer.

Last month the NIH announced the publication of what it called a “landmark collection” of scientific papers in the Cell family of journals on the biology and possible clinical applications of extracellular RNA. Two of those papers, including the paper about exosomes, came from Coffey’s lab.

Virtually every cell in the body releases DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, and other particles. These so-called “nanoparticles” are thought to be a way that cells communicate with each other. But they also might signal cancer to spread — or metastasize — to other parts of the body.

Cancer by its very nature is constantly evolving. That trait enables many tumors to escape or to become resistant to chemotherapy and other efforts to destroy them.

The genetic material released by cancer cells, however, may also reveal their points of vulnerability. A simple blood test that picks up these circulating cancer clues therefore could lead to earlier diagnoses and more effective treatments.

The problem is how to snag cancer-specific genetic material from the sea of circulating nanoparticles. Each milliliter of blood (it takes 5 milliliters to fill a teaspoon) contains a quadrillion (a thousand trillion) nanoparticles, and at least 100 million small extracellular vesicles.

Many of these vesicles are exosomes, which are known to carry extracellular RNA. Exosomes can be identified by the proteins (called antigens) that sprout from their surfaces. Identifying specific exosomes is one thing; determining what they carry is quite another.

The traditional way is to use high-speed centrifugation to spin exosomes out of a blood sample and into a “pellet” at the bottom of a test tube. Biochemical methods are then used to characterize the RNA, DNA, and proteins in the pellet.

The assumption was that the pellet contained only exosomes and their cargoes. But Jeppesen, who earned his PhD in Molecular Medicine at Aarhus University in Denmark, was skeptical. He decided to take a different approach.

Using a technique called high-resolution density gradient fractionation, Jeppesen and his colleagues separated blood components based on their buoyant density. They found that exosomes floated at a relatively low density while higher-density proteins, including those that bind DNA, sank to a lower gradient.

“We showed this for multiple cancer cell lines,” he said. “We also see the same kind of thing in normal cells.”

To isolate and study exosomes apart from the traditional pellet, Jeppesen and his colleagues developed another technique they called direct immunoaffinity capture. They coated magnetic beads with a “capture antibody” that targeted one of the known proteins, or antigens, on the exosome surface.

That’s how they were able to determine that exosomes don’t carry DNA.

The DNA found in pellets must be secreted by the cell in other ways. One way, the Vanderbilt researchers reported, is through the formation of novel hybrid organelles termed amphisomes.

“We can actually see these amphisomes traffic to the cell surface,” Jeppesen said. “Now it’s possible to say with greater precision what’s in the exosome and what’s in these other vesicles. Now you have an idea of what is the target you’re looking for.”